Speed dating research papers

06-Apr-2020 11:20 by 5 Comments

Speed dating research papers

After these brief sessions, organizers hope a special chemistry will develop between some of the participants, prompting the beginnings of a new research relationship.Steven Goodman, who has helped organize the event, sounds a bit like the host of The Bachelor when he discusses the concept.

Faculty from various disciplines across the university have indicated plans to attend, and there’s a financial as well as an intellectual incentive to do so.The modern world provides two new ways to find love — online matchmaking and speed dating.In the last few years, these methods have moved from a last resort for the loveless to a more accepted way for millions to try to meet their mates.“Ninety percent of the time, nothing comes of it except they’ve had an interesting, engaging conversation,” he says.“But some of it works toward new ideas and breakthroughs, and wouldn’t that be cool?While this has led to dates, relationships and marriages around the globe, it has also been a boon for enterprising researchers — providing huge datasets chronicling real world behavior.

Psychological scientists have been studying attraction, love, and romantic relationships for decades, but online matching and speed dating have given researchers unprecedented opportunity to explore who’s attracted to whom and why.Those votes will be used to narrow down the groups with the most promising proposals, who will vie for a portion of ,000 in seed money.The money will go to one or more of the proposals based on the review of a faculty panel.For all of their big ideas, sometimes faculty are a bit like wallflowers at a high school dance; they need a little push to make the first move.So it’s perhaps no surprise that the University of Southern California is using “speed dating” techniques to encourage professors to work together across disciplines.(Although feminine male photos were seen as attractive, whole male profiles were rated more attractive when they seemed more masculine, a perplexing result worthy of more study.) Women were deemed more attractive when they looked feminine, high in self-esteem, and not selfish.